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A day in the Life of a (Serious) Researcher

 

How do researchers really look for and find content for their research? That’s a pretty fundamental question! So I turned to the research project “A Day in the Life of a (Serious) Researcher” with great anticipation to identify that part of the researcher activity relating to seeking and finding information. I found the survey exciting but at the same time questionable in some of its conclusions.

How to deal with the rising price of textbooks

Textbooks (Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

 

Textbook prices are increasing steadily - so what should we do about it?

An interesting article in the Financial Times (Monday 16 May 2016) “Rising Price of Textbooks reaches a tipping point”, reveals the problem and one tutor’s response. US Census Bureau statistics show that textbook prices increased more than 800 per cent between 1978 and 2014, more than triple the cost of inflation. 

Can you charge for adding metadata to free content?

 

Engrade

Clearly you can. A recent post in Book Business Magazine describes how McGraw-Hill Education will include free teaching resources within its paid education platform, Engrade, alongside its own paid resources, on the basis that these free resources are better curated and hence easier to find and to make use of. However, users will be charged for access to the free resources within the platform, since McGraw-Hill state they have had to pay to have them tagged. McGraw-Hill is open about what they are doing: they say they pay to have the material selected for quality and then tagged, so it is only reasonable to charge end users for the selection and better navigation.

Access to Research – the ALPSP answer

 

There is an article in the latest issue of Learned Publishing, the journal of the ALPSP, a trade association representing academic publishers, entitled “Access to Research: an innovative and successful initiative by the UK publishing industry”. That’s all you will learn about this article, because if you go to ALPSP’s host website (Wiley Online Library) you will find the article locked. 

Europeana creates a business strategy

 

Europeana, the EU-funded digital “library” (although it is more a discovery service than a library), has released its business plan for the next five years. The document is excellently designed and produced, but contains little in the way of a business plan. The section “why this is good for you” is placed before the section “how we are going to finance this”. Unfortunately, the section on how we are going to finance it states little. So where will the revenue come from?

Is Digital Disruption the cause of quality decline?

David Crotty, in a Scholarly Kitchen post, talked about declining editorial standards, and suggested that “digital disruption” was at least partly to blame. “Digital disruption” is the phrase used by Clayton Christensen in his book The Innovator’s Dilemma.  Christensen’s idea, as you probably know, is that companies fail because they continue to provide the same services that satisfied their customers in earlier years.

Is this the age of the university press?

Is this, as Mandy Hill suggested in her keynote, “the age of the university press”? Certainly the timing of this conference (the University Press REDUX Conference, Liverpool, 16-17 March 2016) was well-nigh perfect. The organisers should be commended for thinking up the right event at the right time – it’s not every year that you get five or six new university presses founded in the preceding twelve months!

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