Having been a publisher, it is easier for me to appreciate what makes content effective. It might be technology (I currently work in text analytics), or effective meeting of user requirements. It might even be that the text was written clearly.

I have a background in many aspects of structured digital content, from dictionaries and encyclopedias to content management systems. I work with publishers to provide strategic guidance and implementation for digital projects, including content enrichment, information architecture, information-based websites and content repositories. I have been a consultant since 2002, following some twenty years working across a wide range of publishing sectors, including academic (Cambridge University Press), educational (Pearson), trade (Dorling Kindersley, Random House), reference (Helicon Publishing, where I managed the team that created digital editions of several versions of The Hutchinson Encyclopedia), and professional (the IET, CABI, Building Research Establishment, The Stationery Office (TSO).  In truth, there is some commonality between all these. Other clients comprise a wide range of information providers, including newsletter publishers (Electric Word) and magazine publishers (KHL). My perspective has been widened by also working with software companies producing content management software (CSW Group, Abacus E-Media). I have written an introductory book about content licensing (Content Licensing, 2009). I have an occasional blog about aspects of reference publishing I find interesting at With Reference.

Why reference publishing? Well, I started my publishing career in reference publishing – I was involved in early drafts of the Dorling Kindersley Children’s Encyclopedia, I edited EFL dictionaries for Longman (now Pearson), I took over The Hutchinson Encyclopedia in the last days of Hutchinson as an independent publisher, then while at Random House built it into a whole range of database-based reference titles for Helicon Publishing, including the first UK CD-ROM and online encyclopedias. But that was all ages ago!

Today I make my living in the area of text analytics, working with publishers to enhance their digital publishing, and sometimes (just sometimes) these projects touch on principles of information presentation and retrieval that are in fact the same  principles used in reference publishing. And in any case, I retain a sentimental fondness for reference works. I still have the Enlightenment dream within me of making knowledge accessible, intelligible, and enjoyable – and not reserved for an elite. I’m probably a geek – I am enthusiastic about discovering a new (or old) reference work, print or digital, to see how well it solves an information problem. While I am an enthusiastic user of Wikipedia, I certainly don’t believe that Wikipedia represents a model of how to create a reference work, or that it should supersede the thousands of more specific subject reference works that preceded it (and will hopefully continue to be published).

I am a Member of the British Computer Society (MBCS) and a former Member of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (MCLIP). For five years I was a committee member of the UK Electronic Information Group (UKeiG) and I edited their journal Elucidate; the spelling has improved since I left, but they seem to have forgiven me – I’m still writing a regular column for them (Digital Faculty).