Some implications of "digital" for academic publishing

Author: Michael Upshall Page 1 of 10

How not to create a website user survey

I can’t resist surveys. I always sign up for website user experience surveys, because I feel that since I am in the business of digital information, I ought to be prepared to participate to help UX people design better sites. After all, we are told …

How to make research more successful

OCLC have published an interesting-sounding report. The full title of this report is: Social Interoperability in Research Support: Cross-Campus Partnerships and the University Research Enterprise, a bit of a mouthful. The term “social interoperability” is defined as “the creation and maintenance of working relationships …

Blending humanities and data science

Any report with 25 authors must be taken seriously. Or perhaps promises to be fairly dull, since 25 people are unlikely to agree on much that is really innovative. So it wasn’t with huge expectations that I started reading this paper, The challenges and prospects

Discovering content in academic libraries

When you use an academic library catalogue, what are you actually searching?

The graphic shows the main search screen of Cambridge University Library, called iDiscover (actually powered by Primo). The user is presented with, as you might expect, a simple search box, and three options …

Why algorithms need a critical audience

Dan Kolkmann made an interesting point in his recent post about algorithms, entitled, charmingly, ““F**k the algorithm”?: What the world can learn from the UK’s A-level grading fiasco”. The article looks at an example of algorithmic bias, and how best to deal with …

Evaluating recommender systems for academics

Amazon’s “frequently bought together” tool doesn’t inspire confidence: here Amazon recommends The Handmaid’s Tale and A Streetcar named Desire for anyone buying Hamlet.

Recommender systems are the El Dorado of the 21st century. Retailers, manufacturers, content aggregators such as Netflix and Spotify see recommendations as …

In praise of rule-based systems

The London Text Analytics Meetup never fails to provide stimulating talks. Even if you disagree with some of the ideas, or even most of the ideas, you engage with the talk and with the speaker. Tonight’s talk (March 6, 2018) was no exception, Michael Barclay …

How to justify open-access publishing

Joe Esposito’s contributions to Scholarly Kitchen are always well-argued and present an argument from a business-informed point of view that is mercifully free of much of the sloppy thinking around academic publishing. So it was very disappointing to see how negative he was about open …

Is the London Book Fair interested in scholarly publishing?

Ever since Online Information stopped running, several years ago (the last show I attended was in 2011, the last time it took place at Olympia), there has been an opportunity for a London publishing event based around technical and professional publishing. The Frankfurt Book Fair …

Reducing Misinformation: spotting fake news

This presentation at the London Text Analytics Meetup (January 2018) alarmed me a little. The title “Reducing Misinformation” sounds a bit like the heavy-handed slogan painted on the sides of Thames Valley Police Force cars some years ago: “Reducing Crime, Disorder and Fear”. Somehow an admirable goal …

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