Some implications of "digital" for scholarly writing and publishing

Category: book reviews Page 1 of 4

The Library: a Fragile History

Reading Time: 7 minutes

In many countries, especially the UK, the public library is under threat. Despite the establishment of public lending right over 100 years ago, the very existence of public libraries is coming into question: public libraries are underfunded and being closed by …

The London Encyclopaedia

Reading Time: 2 minutes

I picked up a copy of this successful reference book in a charity shop for £3.50. It was the first edition, from 1983 and there have been at least two subsequent editions, but the concept and coverage are unlikely to have …

More about the Failure of the Book

Reading Time: 3 minutes
The Biblia Pauperum, the “Bible of the Poor”, printed in the lower Rhine region or Low countries, c1460. An example of whole-page illustration, where the image, a woodcut, replaces the text entirely. Within a few years, integrated text and illustrations

The Failure of the Book

Reading Time: 3 minutes
Albrecht Pfister, Die Edelstein, thought to be the first illustrated book (1460s). The illustration is a woodcut.  [illustration from the Stadtbibliothek Berlin, public domain]

Books about book history are usually triumphalist: how the printed word democratized knowledge, made learning possible, changed …

Making reviews more open

Reading Time: 2 minutes
The first issue of French Studies (1947). From the start, this journal contained reviews – there were 15 reviews in this issue.

Sjang ten Hagen writes (in the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog) about “the apparent role of book reviewing …

The Scholarly Workflow in the Digital Age

Reading Time: 4 minutes

I expected great things from this book, published in the Charleston Briefings series. Digital scholarship has been around for enough time to assess how things have changed since the era of print; Google Scholar has existed since 2004, which means over …

Charleston Briefings: a new short book format

Reading Time: 5 minutes

The Web is full of ideas for self-improvement: how to be more efficient, more productive, more successful. One tip for reading more effectively is to read only short books (I’m not joking – there is a website that tells you which …

Along came Google … and what happened next

Reading Time: 3 minutes

This is the story of a tragedy: a step forward for the academic community that was resisted and then blocked. It’s difficult to imagine, but Along Came Google (Princeton, 2021) is as gripping as any thriller – except for the conclusion.…

The Myth of Artificial Intelligence

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Erik J Larson has written a passionate attack on the current fashion for AI. For him, the myth of AI is assuming that the current AI-based utilities we have developed can be extended into AGI (artificial general intelligence). His arguments are …

Measuring Research: what everyone needs to know

Reading Time: 6 minutes
Illustration by William Warby (Unsplash)

This short guide, in the “What Everyone Needs to Know” series from Oxford University Press, provides an outline of bibliometrics: measuring the impact and value of research. How to measure research is a topic that has …

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