Some implications of "digital" for academic publishing

Category: scholarly publishing Page 1 of 8

Is Blinkist the Netflix of books?

What Blinkist offers its members

Blinkist really has something. Forget the awful title, and the attempt to present the service as the internet equivalent of Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends: as you can see from the advert above, reading makes you a better …

Is doing a PhD bad for your mental health?

Libraries can be oppressive (image: David Whelan)

I usually find the Impact of Science blog at the LSE site interesting and well informed: an easily readable summary of academic research. A post today, however, struck me as highly questionable: Is doing a PhD bad …

The Atlas of AI

This book is no atlas; the term “atlas” suggests a neutral presentation. Instead, Kate Crawford’s book is a virulent critique of all AI. A better title would be “How computing forms part of the power structure of the modern world”:

AI takes the central position

Is scientific research stuck in the mud?

A car stuck in the mud (photo by Aubrey Odom, Unsplash)

A new article by Johan Chu and James Evans (Slowed canonical progress in large fields of science” suggests some major problems in the current state of scientific research. The authors, from a business school …

Are human indexers obsolete?

They say that the English Lake poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge, only celebrated the natural beauty of the landscape because that landscape was under threat and rapidly disappearing. Perhaps the same is true of the book index. Dennis Duncan’s book (Index, A History of the

Is a manual index worth doing?

Note: I found Duncan’s book so fascinating that I subsequently wrote a much longer post about the book and the issues it raises.

That question is not exactly what Dennis Duncan has answered in his new book (Index, a history of the: A Bookish

How to improve Peer Review

The US Supreme Court Building (photo by Joe Ravi, CC BY-SA 3.0)

The peer review system is a mess, but there is no single cause of the problem. A very interesting paper from Anna Rogers and Isabelle Augenstein reads at times like a cri-de-coeur – …

How Academics discover new content

Cover of the 2021 edition

Imagine you are a researcher, studying, say, bird migration. How do you find out about new papers on your topic? You have written a PhD on the subject, which enabled you to become familiar with all the recent research on …

Success and failure of e-books

A page from an e-book, Northern Renaissance Art (2008)

A new post by Todd Carpenter on Scholarly Kitchen pays tribute to the e-book, on its 50th anniversary. It is of course a tale of success – but also a tale of failure. According to Todd, …

Where do review articles fit within the scholarly user journey?

The academic research journey must be one of the most studied aspects of higher education. One of the most impressive visually was the infographic by Boesman and Kramer, showing the academic research journey in six roughly equal stages – if only to indicate the proliferation …

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